What I Believe

I believe:

That we are spiritual creatures on a human journey

That most animals are more intelligent than humans

In peace, acceptance and respect of everyone, regardless of the skin color, nationality, who you love, what gender you identify with, religion, or political party affiliation. I may not agree with your opinions, but I will defend your right to have them.

That we all are in need of love, home, comfort, food and medical care.

That when Jesus said “Love one another…” He didn’t finish the sentence with “except”.

We are all in this life together to help our brothers and sisters.

Featured post

Small Great Things by Jodi Picoult

Small Great Things

This is such a wonderful book that I’m reposting my review.

I was thinking today of some of my greatest influences, even as a child. Dr. King, Selma, Maya, Mahalia and Dinah Washington.  For some reason, maybe reincarnation? I have always felt a pull.  The first time I heard Dinah sing, “This Bitter Earth”, I cried. When I heard Mahalia sing, “It is No Secret”, I cried.  Maya’s “Still I Rise”, Dr King’s “I Have A Dream”, and when I learned of the events in Selma, I cried.  And recently, after reading Small Great Things.  I don’t cry easily, I really don’t.  And I can’t stand racism, bigotry and xenophobia.

Back to Small Great Things. This book moved me to tears. It is sad, poignant, though-provoking, touching, gripping and compelling.  Without a doubt, this book will be on my favorites shelf.

I have often said that I am “colorblind and a humanist”. I very much believe that everyone should be regarded equally with respect. To me, we are all God’s children. Black, white, gay, straight, Hispanic, Asian, Muslim or Mormon none of it matters to me as neither does creed or religion. As long as you’re not hurting anyone, I believe you should be able to live your life, in peace.

Ruth Jefferson is a labor and delivery nurse at a Connecticut hospital with more than twenty years’ experience. During her shift, Ruth begins a routine checkup on a newborn, only to be told a few minutes later that she’s been reassigned to another patient. The parents are white supremacists and don’t want Ruth, who is African American, to touch their child. The hospital complies with their request, but the next day, the baby goes into cardiac distress while Ruth is alone in the nursery. Does she obey orders or does she intervene?  The infant ends up dying and Ruth is charged with murder and committing a hate crime.

Kennedy McQuarrie, a white public defender, takes her case but gives unexpected advice: Kennedy insists that mentioning race in the courtroom is not a winning strategy. Conflicted by Kennedy’s counsel, Ruth tries to keep life as normal as possible for her family—especially her teenage son—as the case becomes a media sensation. As the trial moves forward, Ruth and Kennedy must gain each other’s trust, and come to see that what they’ve been taught their whole lives about others—and themselves—might be wrong.

A couple of poignant statements:

“I am not a racist, Ruth. And I understand that you’re upset, but it’s a little unfair of you to take it out on me, when I’m just trying to do my best—my professional best—to help you. For God’s sake, if I’m walking down a street and a Black man is coming toward me and I realize I’m going the wrong way, I keep going the wrong direction instead of turning around so he won’t automatically think I’m afraid of him.” “That’s overcompensating, and that’s just as bad,” I say. “You say you don’t see color…but that’s all you see. You’re so hyperaware of it, and of trying to look like you aren’t prejudiced, you can’t even understand that when you say race doesn’t matter all I hear is you dismissing what I’ve felt, what I’ve lived, what it’s like to be put down because of the color of my skin.”

“Active racism is telling a nurse supervisor that an African American nurse can’t touch your baby. It’s snickering at a black joke. But passive racism? It’s noticing there’s only one person of color in your office and not asking your boss why. It’s reading your kid’s fourth-grade curriculum and seeing that the only black history covered is slavery, and not questioning why. It’s defending a woman in court whose indictment directly resulted from her race…and glossing over that fact, like it hardly matters.”

Oh my God. I am guilty of that and I am sorry.  I would never intentionally dismiss what anyone has lived through, especially the black community.  A tweet today from the Women’s March:  “Throughout history, violence has been committed and justified in the name of white womanhood.  Terence Crutcher is no exception.”

I remember Dr. King saying “if you’re not part of the solution, you’re part of the problem.”  And I am left with the question, what can I do to make a difference?

Featured post

7 years ago this morning (sad post)

It’s been 7 long years today, that I had to say goodbye to my beloved tabby Ollie. My baby boy, my ultimate joy, my bestest friend of 17 years. I still miss hím everyday, he was my heart, my world. I pray he hears me and knows how loved and missed he is.

National Poetry Month

In honor of such, I am sharing a couple of my own.

Daily Symphony

Each day plays a song

calls to my heart

& tugs at my soul

Singing softly:

“Embrace life

Embrace love

Face your fears

Be strong”

Hours go too quickly

moments gone

I close my eyes

and hear

birds

wind

river

Life is singing

symphonic

and I refuse

to turn a deaf ear to it

-Cass Smith

Aria

Throughout my life

so many times

I heard the songs of love

but never could hold the rythym

close to me.

You were a prayer

softly whispered on my lips

that’s how i’m certain

that you are a gift to me.

Your love has put music

in my heart

and the melody plays

continuously in my soul.

Like an artist’s brush

you have carefully stroked my whole life

creating a painting

depicting a forever love

no matter if we’re

running in the rain

laughing

or holding each other through the night

I wear your love

head to toe covering me…

giving me strength

and feeling so completely

uninhibitedly safe from harm

and very loved.

You have all of me, my love

for always.

~Cass Smith

The Wonder Boy of Whistle Stop by Fannie Flagg

Fried Green Tomatoes remains where it has been since the first day I read it, still in my top 5 books (and movies) of all time. I have read all of Fannie’s books, and while I do love the Elmwood Springs series, Whistle Stop will always be a place in time, of a town I wish I had grown up in, with a friend named Idgie Threadgoode. So, of course, when Fannie wrote The Wonder Boy of Whistle Stop, I could not wait to read it. And they’re all there, again, Idgie, Ruth, Big George, Ninny, Sipsey and the lovely Evelyn. This time though, Fannie jumps ahead to the life and times of Buddy Jr., Ruth and Franks baby. We learn all about what happened to Whistle Stop and it’s irascible inhabitants. Fannie has such a way of bringing you through the haze and completely immersing the reader into the story, whether you’re fishing with Idgie or playing cards with Buddy Jr., you become a part of the story. Run, don’t walk and grab this soon to be best-seller. Beautifully written, sweet, touching and Lordy, are you ready to fry up some green tomatoes? Time’s a wastin’!

Lyrical Lines

I Can’t Breathe, by Devin Marie I can’t breathe. I can’t breathe. I can’t breathe. I can’t breathe.  I’m tired of living in the skin I’m in I didn’t know danger was synonymous with melanin I go for jogs bur I never ask my brother to come ‘cause God forbid anybody sees a black man […]

Lyrical Lines

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